Colonial Experiences and 
Their Legacies in Southeast Asia
An NEH Summer Institute ~ June 10 - July 5, 2019 ~ Honolulu, Hawai‘i ~ Hosted by Asian Studies Development Program

Colonialism Experiences and
Their Legacies in Southeast Asia
                                                                                     An NEH Summer Institute ~ June 10 to July 5, 2019 ~ Honolulu, Hawaii ~ Hosted by Asian Studies Development Program

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Institute Daily Readings

Presenting faculty will assign readings for their sessions, and the full citation information will an be accessed below. Each presenter has prepared a bibliography that includes assigned readings and optional additional readings. These bibliographies will be available in the Presenter Session Materials under Resources in the coming months.

This list is currently under revision and will be updated as information is available. Access to readings are limited to participants only.

Rangoon: Henzas on the East Side of the Shwe Dagon Pagoda; Linnaeus Tripe (British, Devonport (Plymouth Dock) 1822–1902 Devonport); November 1855; Photo Credit:  The MET


Week 1: Colonial Southeast Asia: Commonalities and Differences

Week 1 Assigned Readings by Presenters

Monday, June 10, 2019
Barbara Watson Andaya: Southeast Asia as a Region

Required:

Anthony Reid, A History of Southeast Asia: Critical Crossroads (London: Wiley Blackwell, 2015), Chapter 1: People in the humid Tropics, pp. 21-29


Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Leonard Andaya: Colonial Rationales, Colonial Resistance: Southeast Asia's Long 19th Century


Required:

Ricklefs, M.C. et al (eds). A New History of Southeast Asia. London: PalgraveMacmillan, 2010, pp. 165-198.


Recommended Reading:

Reid, Anthony. A History of Southeast Asia: Critical Crossroads. London: WILEY Blackwell, 2015, ch. 12 “Making States, 1824-1940,” pp. 240-260.


Kratoska, Paul (ed). South East Asia: Colonial History, vol. II, “Empire-building during the Nineteenth Century”. London and New York: Routledge, 2001.

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Barbara Watson Andaya: Indigenous Responses: Traditional Uprisings in Malaysia and Burma 


Required:

Shaharil Talib, After its Own Image: The Trengganu Experienmce 1881-1941 (Singapore: Oxford University Press, 1984), pp. 134-75


Recommended Reading:

Maitrii Aung-Thwin, “Structuring Revolt: Communities of Interpretation in the Historiography of the Saya San Rebellion.” Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 39, 2 (June 2008): 297-317


Reynaldo Ileto, Volume Two of the Cambridge History of Southeast Asia, 1992, "Religion and Anti-Colonial Movements", pp. 197-248.


Thursday, June 13, 2019

Vina Lanzona: Revolution: The Philippines and the Illustrados (Jose Rizal)


Required:

Benedict Anderson, "The First Filipino." The Spectre of Comparisons: Nationalism, Southeast Asia, and the World (London; New York: Verso, 1998), pp. 227-262


Jose Rizal, "A letter to the Women of Malolos."


Reynaldo C. Ileto, "Toward a History from Below" & "Light and Brotherhood." Payson and Revolution: Popular Movements in the Philippines, 1840-1910. (Manila: Ateneo De Manila Press 1979)



Recommended:

John N. Schumacher, "Rizal in the Context of Nineteenth-Century Philippines." The Making of Nation: Essays on Nineteenth Century Filipino Nationalism (Ateneo De Manila Press 1991)


Reynaldo C. Ileto, "Rizal and the Underside of Philippine History." Filipinos and Their Revolution: Event, Discourse, and Historiography (Ateneo De Manila Press 1999)


Patricio Abinales and Donna J. Amoroso, "State and Society in the Philippines," Second Edition, Rowman and Littlefield: 2017.


Peter Zinoman: Vietnam, the Colonial Bastille and the Rise of Anti-Colonial Nationalism


Required:

Peter Zinoman, "Reading Revolutionary Prison Memoirs," in The Country of Memory: Remaking the Past in Late Socialist Vietnam, Hue-Tam Ho Tai (ed.): 21-45.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Peter Zinoman: Left Wing Activism and the Communist Challenge: The Case of Vietnam


Required:

Tuong Vu, Vietnam's Communist Revolution: The Power and Limits of Ideology, Introduction, 1-30.

Week 2: Experiencing Colonialism: Literature, Religion, Women and the Arts

Week 2 Assigned Readings by Presenters

Monday, June 17, 2019

Anne Hansen: Buddhist Writing: Negotiating Modernity in Colonial Cambodia


Required:

Anne Ruth Hansen, "Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian History" (London and New York: Routledge, 2014), Chpt. 21: Modern Buddhism in Southeast Asia, pp. 224-234


Anne Ruth Hansen, "Modernist Reform in Khmer Buddhist History." 


Thanissaro Bhikku, "To the Kālāmas Kālāma Sutta (AN 3:66)."

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Pattaratorn Chirapravati: Visual Arts and Colonial Experience


Required:

Fiona Kerlogue, "Modern Times." Arts of Southeast Asia (London: Thames and Hudson, 2004) Chpt. 7 pp. 179-206. 

Suggested: 

Aasen, Clarence (1998), Architecture of Siam: a Cultural History Interpretation. (Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press).


Clark, John (1998), Modern Asian Art (Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press).


Taylor, Nora A. and Boreth Ly, ed. (2012), Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art: Anthology (Ithaca, New York: Southeast Asian Program Publications, Cornell University).


Noppe, Catherine and Jean-Francois Hubert, Art of Vietnam (New York: Parkstone Press Ltd).


Peleggi, Maurizio (2002), Lords of Things: The Fashioning of the Siamese Monarch’s Modern Image (Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press).

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Chiara Formichi: Performing Islam: Art and Ritual in the Netherlands East Indies


Required:

Laurie J. Sears,  Shadows of Empire (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 1996) Chapter 1: Colonial Discourse and Javanese Tales, pp. 34-74


Islam at the Tropenmuseum, “Indonesia: avoidance and confrontation,” pp. 205-231


Suggested:

Kartomi, Margaret “Art with a Muslim Theme and Art with a Muslim Flavor among Women in West Aceh”, in Harnish, D. D., & Rasmussen, A. K. (2011). Divine inspirations: Music and Islam in Indonesia. New York: Oxford University Press, Chapter 9 


Ricklefs' Islamisation and its Opponents in Java (introduction and Chapter 1)


Hendrik Maier: Colonial writing – Postcolonial Reading: of the Malay World


Required:
Albert Alberts and E.M. Beekman, The Islands (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press: 1983), The King is Dead, pp. 46-57

Maria Dermoût, The Ten Thousand Things (Amherts: University of Massachusetts Press, 1983), The Island, pp. 5-20

Willem Walraven, An Anthology of Dutch Colonial Literature (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1988), The Clan, pp. 297-321

Sir Hugh Clifford, Stories (Kuala Lumpur: Oxford University Press, 1966), Up Country, pp. 201-209

William Somerset Maugham, Malaysian Stories, The Force of Circumstance, pp. 46-76

Isabelle Bird, The Golden Chersonese and the Way Thither (Kuala Lumpur, London, New York: Oxford U.P., 1968), Letter X, pp. 142-153

Suggested:
Louis Couperus and E. M. Beekman, The Hidden Force (London: Quartet, 1985)

Multatuli, Max Havelaar (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1987)


E.M. Beekman, Troubled Pleasures, Dutch Colonial literature from the Indies (Oxford-New York: Clarendon Press, 1996)


Joseph Conrad, An Outcast of the Islands (various editions)


Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim (various editions)


Joseph Conrad, Almayer’s Folly (various editions)


Douglas Kerr, Eastern Figures - Orient and Empire in British Writing (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2008)


Robert J.C. Young, Postcolonialism – A Very Short Introduction (New York: Oxford University Press Inc., 2003)

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Hendrik Maier: The Writings of Pramoedya Ananta Toer: A Biography of Indonesia


Required:

Pramoedya Ananta Toer, All That Is Gone (New York: Hyperion East, 2004), Chapter 3: In Twilight Born, pp. 49-71


Alston L. Becker, Writing on the Tongue (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, 1989), Reading Revenge by Pramoedya Ananta Toer (1978-1982), pp. 15-60


Suggested:

Pramoedya Ananta Toer: 

- The Mute’s Soliloquy (New York: Hyperion, 1999)

- Tales from Djakarta (Ithaca: SEAP Publications, 1999)

- All That is Gone (New York: Hyperion, 2004)


Adrian Vickers, A History of Modern Indonesia (Cambridge-New York: Cambridge UP, 2005)


Keith Foulcher and Tony Day, Clearing a Space – Postcolonial Readings of Modern Indonesian Literature (Leiden: KITLV Press, 2002)


Christopher GoGwilt, The Passage of Literature (New York: Oxford UP, 2011)


Anthony Burgess, Malayan Trilogy (London: Vintage, 2000)

Friday, June 21, 2019

Week 3: Independence: Struggles, Hopes, and Disappointments

Week 3 Assigned Readings by Presenters

Monday, June 24, 2019

Leonard Andaya: The Second World War and its Aftermath in Southeast Asia


Required:

Reid, Anthony. A History of Southeast Asia: Critical Crossroads. London: WILEY Blackwell, 2015, ch. 16 “Mid-Twentieth-Century Crisis: 1930-1954”, pp. 319-346.


Recommended:

Tarling, Nicholas. A Sudden Rampage: The Japanese Occupation of Southeast Asia 1941-1945. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2001.


Kratoska, Paul (ed). South East Asia: Colonial History, vol. IV, “Imperial Decline: Nationalism and the Japanese Challenge (1920s-1940s)”. London and New York: Routledge, 2001.

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Ardeth Thawnghmung: Experiments with Democracy: Burma and Indonesia 


Required:

Andrew Selth, "All Going According to Plan?" Contemporary Southeast Asia 40, 1 (2018): 1-26


Christ Wilson, "Illiberal Democracy and Violent Conflict in Contemporary Indonesia." Democratization 22, 7 (December 2015): 1317-1337


Recommended:

Dan Slater, "Party Cartelization, Indonesian Style: "Presidential Power-Sharing and the Contingency of Democratic Opposition." Journal of East Asia Studies 18 (2018): 23-46


John T. Sidel, "Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy Revisited: Colonial State and Chinese Immigrant in the Making of Modern Southeast Asia." Comparative Politics 40, 2 (January 2008): 127-147

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Ardeth Thawnghmung: Colonial Legacies: Ethnic Divisions in Myanmar


Required:

Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung, "Politics of Indigeneity in Myanmar: Competing Narratives in Rakhine State." Asian Ethnicity 17, 4 (May 2016): 527-547


Robert H. Taylor, "Perceptions of Ethnicity in the Politics of Burma." Southeast Asian Journal of Social Science 10, 1 (1982): 7-22

Recommended:


Donald D. Renard, "Minorities in Burmese History." Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia 2, 2 (August 1987): 255-271


George Dutton: Post-colonial and Post-war Legacies in Literature


Required:

Nguyen Huy Thiep, “The Water Nymph,” (1992) pp. 209-220 (11pp) in Dutton, ed Voices of Southeast Asia (ME Sharp, 2014).


Ho Anh Thai, Women on the Island (1988),Chapter 5, pp. 88-102 (University of Washington Press, 2000).


“Introduction” (about Ho Anh Thai) in Women on the Island, pp. v-xvi


“Introduction” (about Nguyen Thiep), pp. ix-xvii, in Nguyen Nguyet Cam and Dana Sachs, eds. Nguyen Huy Thiep, Crossing the River, (Curbstone Press, 2003).


Truong Chinh, “Marxism and Vietnamese Culture,” (1948), pp. 522-530 in George Dutton, Jayne Werner and John Whitmore, eds, Sources of Vietnamese Tradition (Columbia University Press, 2012).


Recommended:

Mochtar Lubis, Twilight in Djakarta, (1963), trans. Claire Holt, pp. 15-25, 49-65, (Oxford University Press, 1983).


Thursday, June 27, 2019

Patricio Abinales: Internal Colonization: Mindanao and the Philippines Under Marcos


Required:

Michael Hawkins, "Imperial historicism and American military rule in the Philippines’ Muslim south." Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 39, 3 (October 2008), pp 411–429


Recommended:

Patricio Abinales and Donna J. Amoroso, "State and Society in the Philippines," Second Edition, Rowman and Littlefield: 2017.

Friday, June 28, 2019

Week 4: Postcolonial Challenges: Modernity and Development

Week 4 Assigned Readings by Presenters

Monday, July 1, 2019

Barbara Watson Andaya: The Changing Roles of Women in Society


Required:

Barbara Watson Andaya, “Women, Globalization and Religious Change in Southeast Asia.’” In Women of Asia: Globalization, Development and Gender Equity, ed. Mehrangiz Najafizadeh and Linda L. Lindsey )New York and London: Routledge), pp. 139-153


Michael Peletz, “Gender, Sexuality and the State in Southeast Asia.” Journal of Asian Studies 71, 4 (November 2012): 895-917


Recommended: 

Catherine Renshaw, “Global or Regional? Realizing Women’s Rights in Southeast Asia.” Human Rights Quarterly 39, 3 (August 2017): 707-745.


Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Jeffrey Winters: The Creation of Oligarchies: Singapore, Indonesia and the Philippines


Required (92 pages):

“Sultanistic Oligarchies,” chapter 4 (all), in Jeffrey A. Winters, Oligarchy (Cambridge University Press, 2011).


“Civil Oligarchies,” chapter 5 (Singapore section only), in Jeffrey A. Winters, Oligarchy (Cambridge University Press, 2011).


Recommended:

From Michele Ford and Thomas B. Pepinsky, eds., Beyond Oligarchy: Wealth, Power, and Contemporary Indonesian Politics (Cornell Southeast Asia Publications, 2014):

- Michele Ford and Thomas Pepinsky, “Preface.”

- Vedi Hadiz and Richard Robison, “The Political Economy of Oligarchy and the Reorganization of Power in Indonesia.”

- Edward Aspinall, “Popular Agency and Interests in Indonesia’s Democratic Transition and Consolidation.”


Nathan Gilbert Quimpo, “Can the Philippines’ Wild Oligarchy Be Tamed?” in William Case, ed. Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Democratization (Routledge, 2015).


Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Jeffrey Winters: Democracy with Inequality in Southeast Asia


Required (50 pages):

Garry Rodan, “Conflict, Oppositional Spaces and Political Representation in Southeast Asia,” in William Case, ed. Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Democratization (Routledge, 2015).


Jeffrey Winters, “Oligarchy and Democracy in Indonesia,” in Michele Ford and Thomas B. Pepinsky, eds., Beyond Oligarchy: Wealth, Power, and Contemporary Indonesian Politics (Cornell Southeast Asia Publications, 2014)


Recommended:

From Alfred W. McCoy, ed., An Anarchy of Families: State and Family in the Philippines (University of Wisconsin Press, 2009):

- Alfred W. McCoy, “Preface: The Philippine Oligarchy at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century.”

- Alfred W. McCoy, “‘An Anarchy of Families’: The Historiography of State and Family in the Philippines.”


Inequality in Asia and the Pacific in the Era of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), May 7, 2018



Nora Taylor: Southeast Asian Art as a Medium of Protest


Required:

Werner Kraus, “First Steps to Modernity: The Javanese Painter Raden Saleh (1811-1880)” in Maurizio Peleggi, John Clark, T.K. Sabapathy eds., Eye of the Beholder, Reception, Audience, and Practice of Modern Asian Art, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2007, pp. 29-55


Nora A. Taylor, “Framing the National Spirit: Viewing and Reviewing Painting under the Revolution,” in Hue-Tam Ho Tai, ed., The Country of Memory: Remaking the Past in Late Socialist Vietnam, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001, pp. 109-134


Recommended:

Adrienne Fast, “Exaggerated Enmity in Early Modern Indonesian Painting,” http://www.asianart.com/articles/fast/index.html


Boitran Huynh-Beattie, “Saigonese Art During the War: Modernity versus Ideology,” in Tony Day and Maya H.T. Liem, eds., Cultures at War: The Cold War and Cultural Expression in Southeast Asia,” Ithaca: Cornell University SEAP Press, 2010, pp. 81-102


Iola Lenzi, “Conceptual Strategies in Southeast Asian Art: A Local Narrative,” in Concept, Contest, Contestation: Art and the Collective in Southeast Asia, Bangkok: BACC, 2014, pp. 10-25


Apinan Poshyananda, “The Development of Contemporary Art in Thailand: Traditionalism in Reverse,” in Caroline Turner ed., Tradition and Change: Contemporary Art of Asia and The Pacific, Brisbane: University of Queensland Press, 1993, pp. 93-106


Helena Spanjaard, “The Controversy between the Academies of Bandung and Yogyakarta,” in Modernity in Asian Art, John Clark ed., Sydney: University of Sydney East Asian Series Number 7, 1991, pp. 85-105

Thursday, July 4, 2019

Muhammad Ali: Colonialism's Legacies and the Religious Response


Required:

Ali, Muhamad, Chapter 1, “Organising Da’wah and Spreading Reform”, Islam and Colonialism: Becoming Modern in Indonesia and Malaya (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016) pp.35-70


Recommended:

Muhamad Ali, Chapter 2 “Colonising the Muslim East and Reinforcing Culture”, Islam and Colonialism: Becoming Modern in Indonesia and Malaya (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016), pp. 74-102


Jeffrey Hadler, Muslims and Matriarchs: Cultural Resilience in Indonesia through Jihad and Colonialism (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2008)


Nico Kaptein, Islam, Colonialism, and the Modern Age in the Netherlands East Indies: A Biography of Sayyid ‘Uthman (1822-1914) (Leiden: Brill, 2014)


Michael Laffan, The Makings of Indonesian Islam: Orientalism and the Narration of a Sufi Past (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2011)


Friday, July 5, 2019