Colonial Experiences and 
Their Legacies in Southeast Asia
An NEH Summer Institute ~ June 10 - July 5, 2019 ~ Honolulu, Hawai‘i ~ Hosted by Asian Studies Development Program

Colonialism Experiences and
Their Legacies in Southeast Asia
                                                                                     An NEH Summer Institute ~ June 10 to July 5, 2019 ~ Honolulu, Hawaii ~ Hosted by Asian Studies Development Program

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Testimonials

I cannot say enough good things about this experience. The Hawaiian location of the institute was beautiful and culturally rich, which fit very well with the theme of "Buddhist Traditions, Transmissions, Transformations." The Institute Director and staff were incredibly kind and generous with their time and energy, and were always available and helpful in any situation. The schedule was very well-organized and the lecture topics were thoughtful and rigorous. I gained tremendously from this experience; it opened my eyes to the enormous breadth of Buddhist studies, informed me of the latest scholarship, and refined my understanding of Buddhist terms, concepts and philosophical nuances. This experience has definitely already positively impacted my teaching and will further affect every Art History course I teach in future, as well as sparked new directions in my own current research, scholarship and curatorial projects.

Scholar participant from the 2015 Buddhist Asia:  Traditions, Transmissions and Transformations

Photo Credit:  2017 Islam in Asia:  Traditions and Transformations
This is a great seminar, the best that I have had so far, and will leave immeasurable impact on my teaching and scholarship in the future. All of the lecture presenters have been well prepared and provided us with their uttermost help. The materials for both teaching and scholarship are so immense that we will definitely benefit from it for a "long" while. This experience has lifted my confidence, cleared the vision of my future research interest, and strengthened my overall knowledge of Confucianism and its contemporary role in the changing order of the world.

Scholar participant from the 2016 Confucian Asia:  Traditions and Transformations
This program is unique in that it provides a venue for scholars to do extensive in depth study in an area which not be their area of specialization but is an area of competency that they want to develop in more depth. The program did an excellent job of providing a historical, philosophical, and artist overview of
Buddhism in East Asia, and, further, it provided ample opportunities to pursue themes in and research interests in great depth.

Scholar participant from the 2018 Buddhist East Asia:  Religion, the Arts and Politics
As with all East West and NEH programs, this institute had a transformative impact. I have been struggling with both a lack of knowledge and uncertain methodology in teaching Islamic content. Now I feel confident that I can teach Islamic religion and culture accurately and with cultural humility (a new term I learned during the Institute). I am also involved heavily with curriculum development and teaching and learning instruction, this institute will go a long way to developing and improving programs designed to promote global perspectives for students and faculty.

Scholar participant from the 2017 Islam in Asia:  Traditions and Transformations
This was a terrific experience and will have a significant impact on my teaching -- both in content and coverage, as well as my future scholarship. I began with little more than a rudimentary familiarity with Confucianism and now feel competent to include it in courses and to engage with materials. At times I
felt that the discussions and presentations assumed a higher familiarity with Chinese language and history as well as Western philosophy than I possessed, and that I was limited in what I was able to get from lectures and discussions, but this varied from session to session.

Scholar participant from the 2016 Confucian Asia:  Traditions and Transformations
In terms of scholarship, I am hoping to contribute a chapter to an edited book that will come out of the summer institute. Although I have not yet written the piece, I want to focus on the importance of reassessing the importance of Islam in Asian Religions related courses. As someone who took many courses on Asian religions in grad school, and now is in charge of teaching them, it became obvious during my month at the NEH Institute of how many Asian Religions related courses barely deal with Islam since this is usually considered a tradition centered in the Middle East. After the Institute I feel that it is my responsibility as a scholar to change that perception in my own courses by exposing students to the contributions that Islam has had all across Asian cultures.

Scholar participant from the 2017 Islam in Asia:  Traditions and Transformations
Photo Credit:  2017 Islam in Asia:  Traditions and Transformations
The visiting faculty who presented lectures and led discussions were all outstanding. I was impressed that faculty experts came from several different institutions, both national and foreign. All of the faculty were well-prepared and well-spoken in their presentations and their talks stimulated me in many ways. I appreciated that the fact that we were able to learn from scholars in multiple disciplines: philosophy, religious studies, history and art history. The round table discussion sessions provided a good forum for participations to ask questions of the faculty.

Scholar participant from the 2018 Buddhist East Asia:  Religion, the Arts and Politics
Colleagues was a diverse group--different backgrounds (anthropology, archaeology, history, political science, literature, art history, music, philosophy, religious studies,), different levels of expertise--content area coverage as well as doctoral students, adjunct instructors, assistant and associate professors, and established, published scholars, and those with Buddhist practice experience, and who were not; it was a very collegial group--we learned from each other's insights and research projects for the institute, as well as got along very well socially. Lots of wonderful conversations during each lecture and after film sessions as well as after hours.

Scholar participant from the 2015 Buddhist Asia:  Traditions, Transmissions and Transformations
I found that the movies and the visit to the art museum also provided useful information as well as inspiration for how such material might be incorporated into my teaching.

Scholar participant from the 2018 Buddhist East Asia:  Religion, the Arts and Politics
Photo Credit:  2017 Islam in Asia:  Traditions and Transformations
The East West center was the perfect venue - all within five minute walk, with very affordable housing and daily cleaning by stuff. The library has one of the best Eest Asian collections in the country, and the venue was really good to foster engagement.

Scholar participant from the 2018 Buddhist East Asia:  Religion, the Arts and Politics
I feel so blessed to have worked with the co-directors and ASDP staff. They were all wonderful, extremely hospitable, and truly embody the aloha spirit.

Scholar participant from the 2016 Confucian Asia:  Traditions and Transformations